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Ice Cream in a Bag!

Make your own ice cream at home without an ice cream maker!

Ingredients:

2 cups heavy whipping cream

2 cups half-and-half cream

1/2 cup white sugar

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1 bag crushed ice

4 cups coarse salt

Other Supplies:

2 pint-size resealable plastic freezer bags

1 gallon-size resealable plastic freezer bag

Gloves or towel to protect fingers

Directions:

1.  In a pitcher or large measuring cup, stir together the whipping cream, half-and-half, sugar, and vanilla extract until sugar has dissolved.

2.   Pour about 1/2 cup of mixture into a pint-size plastic bag and seal carefully, squeezing out extra air. Place each sealed bag into a second pint-size bag, again squeezing out extra air. Seal carefully.

3.  Fill each gallon-size plastic bag about halfway with ice and add 1/2 cup coarse salt. Place one sealed small bag into the large bag, squeeze out most of the air, and seal the large bag.

4.   Wear mittens or thick gloves, or wrap the bag in a towel to protect hands against the extreme cold. Shake and massage the bag for about 5 minutes or until mixture thickens into ice cream. Add more salt and ice to the outer bag if ice cream hasn’t formed after 10 minutes of continuous motion.

5.   Remove the outer pint-size bag before you open the inner bag so you don’t get any of the salty ice on your ice cream!

Kidcreate Studio is an art studio just for kids that offers children’s art classes,
camps and art-themed birthday parties for children ages 18 months through 12 years.
Making a mess is the best at Kidcreate!

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Homemade Sidewalk Chalk

Here’s a great sunny day art project from Martha Stewart that we found on Pinterest.

 

Kidcreate Studio is an art studio just for kids that offers children’s art classes,
camps and art-themed birthday parties for children ages 18 months through 12 years.
Making a mess is the best at Kidcreate!

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I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream for Ice Cream!

Ice Cream Sundae Art Project

Are you looking for a fun art project to try at home? Here is a project for all the ice cream loving kids out there!

This project was inspired by the amazing food art created by artists Claes Oldenburg and Wayne Theibaub. Click on the links below to learn more about these great artists!

Ice Cream SundaeMaterials needed:

Model Magic (primary colors and white) Model Magic is available at Target and Michaels. 
(Or make your own Model Magic-  Click here to learn how.)

Paper plates

Brown tempera paint

Elmer’s glue

Paper

Pencils

Crayons/Markers/Colored pencils

Directions:

  • It’s always a good idea to draw out your ideas before your start working with Model Magic, so let’s start with pencil and paper!  Draw your dessert with pencil and then add in the color and details with crayons, markers or colored pencils. Get as detailed as you want. Be creative and have fun!
  • Now it’s time to get out the Model Magic! Did you know that Model Magic colors can be mixed together? Take a ball of each of the colors you would like to mix. Knead the colors together to combine. The longer you work at it, the better the colors will mix. Working with Model Magic like this is a great way to learn color theory (red + blue= purple, blue + yellow= green, red + yellow= orange ). Mix away and create the colors you need for your sculpture.
  • Now that your colors are ready it’s time to start creating your delicious sculptures! Using the paper plate as your base, start with the dish for your sundae and work your way up. Don’t forget to refer back to your drawing as your work.
  • It’s time for the finishing touch, chocolate syrup glue! Mix a small amount of brown paint and glue together. Then, drizzle the mixture over the top of your dessert sculpture.

For more information about these artists, click on the links below-

Claes Oldenburg

Claes Oldenburg on Wikipedia

Claes Oldenburg’s art available to view in the Twin Cities (from ArtsConnectEd) 

Visit the Claes Oldenburg & Coosje van Bruggen Spoonbridge and Cherry scuplture at the Walker’s Sculpture Garden

Wayne Theibaub

Wayne Theibaub on Wikipedia

 

Kidcreate Studio is an art studio just for kids that offers children’s art classes,
camps and art-themed birthday parties for children ages 18 months through 12 years.
Making a mess is the best at Kidcreate!

.

Go Green! Recycle Old, Dried Out Markers into Paint!

Oh, no! You just stumbled across another dried out marker. Will your kids ever remember to put the caps back on!?! No worries. Instead of throwing it away, put it aside along with other dried out markers in preparation for a project that is both creative and environmentally friendly. With just a few steps and a few inexpensive supplies, you can recycle your dried out markers into watercolor paint.

 

marker paint 21) Once you have a collection of dried out markers organize them into similar colors.

2) Fill a plastic cup with water. Using 1-3 markers at a time, soak the tips of the markers in water. To speed up the process, take the markers apart, removing the internal ink-filled felt core and submerging it into the cup of water. There is no hard and fast rule as to how much water to use, so you will have to do a little experimentation. However, the more water that you use, the more diluted the ink will be.

marker paint 1If you prefer pastel colors, soak the tips or core in more water. If you prefer brighter colors, use less water and more markers. Once you have sufficiently soaked the markers in water, transfer your new paint into lidded bottles for storage.

3) Now for the fun part. Fill squeeze bottles with your new “paint.” Your kids can then squeeze a little of each color into their paint palettes or into plastic egg cartons. Before you know it, they will have created mini-masterpieces using paint produced from this green process.

Kidcreate Studio is an art studio just for kids that offers children’s art classes,
camps and art-themed birthday parties for children ages 18 months through 12 years.
Making a mess is the best at Kidcreate!

.

Summer To-Do List!

Great Ideas for Your Families Summer To-Do List!

Looking for some fun ways to keep your kids busy this summer? Here’s a couple hundred great ones! Check out the Summer Bucket Lists we pinned in our This Summer’s To-Do List board on pinterest!

 


Kidcreate Studio is an art studio just for kids that offers children’s art classes,
camps and art-themed birthday parties for children ages 18 months through 12 years.
Making a mess is the best at Kidcreate!

.

Escher Tessellations

Relativity

M.C. Escher was known for the “impossible structures” shown in his art. He was also considered the ‘Father’ of modern tessellations.

An example of one of Escher’s “impossible structures” can be seen in Relativity. Look at this picture. Try to figure out which way the people are walking. Can you do it?

Escher’s art is filled with mathematical relationships between shapes, figures and space. He even wrote papers on math later in his life. Amazing since, as a child, he didn’t do well in math class!

Art Kidbit: Tesselation

Escher 49

A tessellation is composed of a picture or tiles, mostly in the form of animals, which cover the surface of a plane in a symmetrical way without overlapping or leaving gaps. That’s a pretty complicated definition for something that looks like it is made out of interlocking puzzle pieces! Escher 49 is an example of a tessellation.

Try this tessellation art project at home-

Supplies-

Index card
Large sheet of white paper
Pencil
Scissors
Scotch tape
Black marker
Crayons, color pencils or paints

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Instructions-

tesselations_figure1
1) With your pencil draw a line from left to right across the index card. The line can be straight or squiggly. (Figure 1)

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tesseslations_figure2
2) Draw a line from top to bottom on the index card. Again, the line can be straight or squiggly. (Figure 2)

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tesselations_figure3
3) With scissors, cut along the lines. You should end up with 4 pieces. (Figure 3)

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tesselations_figure4
4) Rotate the pieces so the outer corners (corners marked x on the diagram) touch. Tape the shapes together. Now you have created a stencil for your tessellation. (Figure 4)

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tesselations_figure55) Look at the shape you created. What does it look like? Does it look like a flower, a turtle or maybe a frog? Decide what it is going to be. You will be coloring it in later. We decided that the shape in our example would be a flower. (Figure 5)

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tessellations_figure6
6) On your large piece of paper, use the stencil to create a repeating pattern. If you did the stencil correctly, your outlines should fit together like a puzzle.  (Figure 6)

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tessellations_figure77) Use your crayons, color pencils or paints to color in each of your objects. Alternate colors to create a really cool pattern. (Figure 7)

 

Kidcreate Studio is an art studio just for kids that offers children’s art classes,
camps and art-themed birthday parties for children ages 18 months through 12 years.
Making a mess is the best at Kidcreate!

.

Escher Tessellations

 M. C. Escher – Tessellations

M.C. Escher was known for the “impossible structures” shown in his art. An example of this can be seen in Relativity. Look at this picture. Try to figure out which way the people are walking. Can you do it?

He was also considered the ‘Father’ of modern tessellations. A tessellation is composed of a picture or tiles, mostly in the form of animals, which cover the surface of a plane in a symmetrical way without overlapping or leaving gaps. That’s a pretty complicated definition for something that looks like it is made out of interlocking puzzle pieces! Escher 49 is an example of a tessellation.

Escher 49

Escher’s art is filled with mathematical relationships between shapes, figures and space. He even wrote papers on math later in his life. Amazing since, as a child, he didn’t do well in math class!

Try this tessellation art project at home-

Supplies-

Index card
Large sheet of white paper
Pencil
Scissors
Scotch tape
Black marker
Crayons, color pencils or paints

.

Instructions-

tesselations_figure1
1) With your pencil draw a line from left to right across the index card. The line can be straight or squiggly. (Figure 1)

.

tesseslations_figure2
2) Draw a line from top to bottom on the index card. Again, the line can be straight or squiggly. (Figure 2)

.

tesselations_figure3
3) With scissors, cut along the lines. You should end up with 4 pieces. (Figure 3)

.

tesselations_figure4
4) Rotate the pieces so the outer corners (corners marked x on the diagram) touch. Tape the shapes together. Now you have created a stencil for your tessellation. (Figure 4)

.

.

tesselations_figure55) Look at the shape you created. What does it look like? Does it look like a flower, a turtle or maybe a frog? Decide what it is going to be. You will be coloring it in later. We decided that the shape in our example would be a flower. (Figure 5)

.

tessellations_figure6
6) On your large piece of paper, use the stencil to create a repeating pattern. If you did the stencil correctly, your outlines should fit together like a puzzle.  (Figure 6)

.

.

tessellations_figure77) Use your crayons, color pencils or paints to color in each of your objects. Alternate colors to create a really cool pattern. (Figure 7)